Oils, the good, the bad, and the ugly

When people ask me of the main things that wreak havoc on people's health I normally say Genetically modified foods, high fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners containing aspartame and other poisons, but the 4th that folks don't seem to be as aware of, is the oils we consume.

You'll be amazed at the countless number of presumably healthy recipes I run across on healthy eating blogs, that use some of the worst oils, oils that really are not fit to be considered edible by humans.

The good news is we don't have to be afraid of oils, or think by default they will make us fat. I am a living witness to that because I use quality oils (coconut and olive oils) liberally and have not gained and inch in the waist, and have perfect cholesterol scores!!!!!!

I ran across the information below when a friend was asking me about peanut oil. The info below is veer-badum copied from a great blogger's post, the blog name is Mark's Daily Apple. His research on oil amazingly lined up with mine, and no since re-inventing the wheel. I have a have a few comments and slight difference of opinion on one or two things below, but that's to be expected. Other people may have different opinions as well, so no one is obligated to take his, or my opinion as gospel. But for those who aren't into researching this stuff, I think these are good guidelines.

Ready, Set, Go……….

Canola

Canola oil comes from rapeseed, a completely unpalatable seed rich in erucic acid, which is bitter and rather toxic. Canola oil is rapeseed oil stripped of erucic acid, as I detailed in this previous post. It gets a lot of attention from doctors as a “heart healthy” oil (one of the “good” fats) rich in omega-3s, but the fact that canola processing generally uses upwards of 500 degrees means a good portion of the Omega-3s could be rancid on the shelf.

***Gaia Health Blog's Comments on Canola – Canola is one of the worst foods brought into the human food supply since the dawn of man. The marketing campaign behind it will always confuse people about it, but anyone like family and friends who trust my general opinion I tell them to "AVOID CANOLA LIKE THE PLAGUE". Take canola out of your like and you will automatically lose 10 pounds of unwanted fat. Try it and see….

Flax Seed

I mentioned the seed and its oil a few times, and, after being initially supportive of flax consumption, I now recommend minimizing intake. People generally use flax oil as an Omega-3 supplement, rather than for cooking – and this is a good choice, seeing as how flax is almost entirely made of PUFAs, which are prone to rancidity and oxidation when exposed to heat. Meat eaters, though, would be better off just taking fish oil. The DHA and EPA in fish oil are far more useful than the ALA in flax seed oil. Strict vegetarians, have at it – just don’t use flax seed oil to sautee your tofu.

*** Gaia Health Blog's Comment on Flaxseed Oil: I learned in my research of the "possibility" that flaxseed may affect and raise estrogen levels in men. My research came up inconclusive, and I can't say I even know the ramifications of consuming foods that could raise estrogen levels in men , but I choose to avoid this product as a precaution, and there are other healthy choices out there.

Corn

Corn oil boggles my mind. I can’t wrap my head around how extracting gallons upon gallons of liquid oil from a lowly corncob is actually possible. How isn’t it too much work for the payoff? I mean, I’m no corn eater, but I’ve chomped a few kernels in my day, and I don’t understand how squeezing oil out of this non-vegetable sounds like a good idea to anyone.

Olive (and variations)

Olive oil got a pretty good breakdown last year, so unless I’m leaving out some recent momentous news breaking out of the highly secretive olive oil world, there’s not much more to say. It’s a delicious salad oil, a decent sautéing oil, and it can even be used as moisturizer and shaving lotion. Olive oil is one area where CW gets it right. Enjoy this one, and keep a bottle of extra virgin, cold pressed olive oil on hand for salad dressings. It also does a decent job standing up to heat, but will lose it’s delicate flavors if heated too high. This is a good enough reason for me to use a different fat/oil when cooking at high temps. (Why waste precious (and often expensive!) olive oil when lard, for instance, will do the trick?)

*** Gaia Health Blog Comment on Olive Oil – My other "trusted oil compadre" along with coconut oil. I use a lot in salads and such, although I don't cook with olive oil as much as coconut oil. Like coconut oil, I use olive oil VERY liberally in that it doesn't make me fat. If you want a read an interesting quick article I wrote, reas how a 111 year old man says olive oil is one of the five foods has given him a long healthy live (he claims he has never been sick). Go to that article here

Coconut

MDA’s darling, coconut oil is truly a star. I went over why yesterday, and in past posts, but the gist of it is this: it’s a tasty, shelf-stable (no hydrogenation required) tropical oil with a ton of saturated fatty acids. In fact, it’s almost purely saturated, which is why most doctors and nutritionists will probably advise against its consumption. Not us, though. We love SFA. The refined coconut oil stands up to heat a bit better, and it doesn’t have a distinctive taste, but I can’t recommend it. Unrefined virgin oil is a murky, cloudy mess – but a delicious, creamy mess. Eat the unrefined by the spoonful.

***Gaia Health Blog's Comment on Coconut Oil: just wanted to reiterate what Mark's Daily Apple said, avoid the refined coconut oil and stick with the pure virgin unrefined coconut oil. And feel free to use it liberally, and watch how it does not make you fat, but might help you shed pounds!!!!!.

Palm

Palm oil is controversial; just check out the comments section on my last post on the subject. Many palm oil plantations encroach upon the rapidly dwindling natural habitats of the orangutan, which are already in short supply in this world. The consensus seems to be that sustainable palm oil, especially the more complex, nutritious unrefined red palm oil, can be found. You’ve just got to look a little harder at the labels. West African red palm oil, for example, is considered to be pretty safe environmentally. Oh, and palm oil is also highly saturated and heat stable. Red palm oil is also stable, but it deserves special mention for its nutrient density – lots of CoQ10, Vitamin E, and SFAs.

Fish

Fish oil is another one of the widely accepted “good” fats. This time, though, we agree with Conventional Wisdom. The Omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, are unequivocally beneficial to us. They help balance our O6-O3 ratios (to a more appropriate, pre-agricultural level), while they also promote proper cell function, good lipid numbers, and improved insulin sensitivity. To bone up on more fish oil information, check out my Definitive Guide on the subject.

EPA and DHA levels vary by brand and type of fish. Check the label for yourself, or look at this handy table if you’re getting your fish oil from actual seafood.

Avocado

Who doesn’t love a plump avocado with the right amount of give? If you can’t get your hands on a good one, the next best thing might be a bottle of avocado oil. Its fatty acid profile is similar to that of olive oil, but it has an even higher smoke point, making it a decent choice for cooking. Personally, I still wouldn’t use it for high heat cooking. The light, subtle taste lends itself far better to salad dressing, if you ask me. Buy in dark bottles to minimize oxidation.

Walnut

Walnut oil is one of the better tasting nut oils. It is high in Omega-6s, sure, but walnut oil isn’t something you’re going to use every day, or even every week. The stuff tastes great, though, and a small splash goes a long way at the end of a cooking session or onto a tossed salad. I definitely would advise against using this on a regular basis, especially for cooking, and you should always store it in a dark, cool spot in the house. For those that “do dairy”, try mixing a bit with some full-fat Greek yogurt, or unsweetened fresh whipped cream and berries: amazing.

Macadamia Nut

I love this oil, but I also love the parent nut. The oil assumes the buttery, smooth, rich flavor of the macadamia nut, making it an interesting – but favorable – choice for salad dressings. It’s also remarkably high in MUFAs and low in PUFAs, so it won’t throw your ratios all out of whack. Makes a surprisingly good homemade mayonnaise, and can be used to sauté and cook in a pinch. The only drawback is its price; macadamia nut oil can get expensive.

Sesame Seed

The premier “flavor oil.” Sesame seed oil, especially the toasted variety, offers an unmatched and irreplaceable flavor profile. Certain Asian dishes work best with a bit of sesame oil, but if you’re wary of using it over high heat (which you probably should be), you can always add it to the dish after cooking. Despite the high PUFA content, sesame oil also contains a ton of antioxidants that can help minimize heat oxidation. I wouldn’t use this more than semi-regularly, though. Good to keep in your pantry (or fridge), but not an everyday item.

*** Gaia Health Blog's Comment on Sesame Oil: I can't speak for sesame as a cooking oil but Sesame Oil has been used for thousands of years as a healing oil in Ayurvedan healing practices. I know this first hand,  because I use Sesame Seed Oil in the process of what is called "Oil Pulling", where you swish sesame seed oil around the mouth for 20 minutes in the morning, and the enzymes from the oil whiten the teeth, pull toxins from the body, and supposedly cures a host of diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Thus I would NEVER look at this as a bad oil, I think it is a gift from mother nature. However I can't speak for cooking with it, as heat has the potential to change the properties of any oil, I don't have the need to cook with it since coconut oil satisfies all my cooking needs .

Peanut

Restaurants like to tout that they use “healthy” peanut oil in their deep fryers. Okay, the relatively MUFA-rich peanut oil may be a better choice than corn or sunflower oil for high heating, but it’s still a legume (already off limits) oil prone to rancidity. In the UK, it’s known as groundnut oil. Avoid both.

Sunflower Seed

Insanely high in PUFAs with little to no Omega-3s to balance them out, sunflower seed oil is a pretty bad choice for sauteeing, baking, roasting, and even salad making. Trouble is it’s everywhere, and it has a reputation for being healthy. Just don’t keep the stuff in your house (not a problem; it’s flavorless, odorless, and completely boring), and keep dining out in cheap chain restaurants to a minimum (or you could do what I do and request everything be cooked in butter), and you should be able to avoid sunflower seed oil.

Safflower

Like sunflower seed oil but worse, the oil derived from the “bastard saffron” is about 75% Omega-6 PUFAs with not a speck of Omega-3 in sight. It’s also lower in MUFAs and SFAs. What’s not to dislike?

Cottonseed

At least most of the oils I’ve mentioned come from technically edible plants, in some form or another. Cottonseed oil, however, comes from cotton. You know, the stuff that shirts are made of? Yeah. It’s everywhere, from margarines to cereal to shortening to frozen desserts to bread, because it’s cheaper than other oils (you can thank its status as one of Monsanto’s big four genetically modified crops for that) and it only needs “partial hydrogenation” to maintain stability. Luckily, that won’t be an issue for PBers who already avoid all that stuff in the first place. Warn your friends and family, though.

Grape Seed

Skip this stuff. It does have a buttery taste, and it gets a lot of hype as a worthy replacement for olive oil, but it’s got high oxidation potential, especially if you follow the recommended instructions and use it for deep frying or high heat sauteeing. It’s rather pricey, too, so there’s no good reason to use it.

Soybean Oil

Soybean oil is about as ubiquitous as corn and canola (again, thanks to Monsanto). In fact, you’ll often see an ingredient list include “canola and/or soybean oil.” Huh? Do food manufacturers honestly not know what kind of fat is going into their product? Best avoid the crapshoot and skip anything that “might contain” soybean oil altogether. The fact that it’s often partially hydrogenated suppresses my appetite even further. No thanks

for Mark's Daily Apple original article go here. Good Job Mark!!!!

~stay healthy~

.

check out all my articles in "Eat Smart", the science of food (click here or on the photo below)

posted to   fat tuesdays real food Wednesdays Fight Back Fridays

2 Responses

01.13.14

Hi,
I use rice bran oil for cooking. Could you please tell us if it's good or bad? Thanks a bunch.
Razia

01.13.14

I don’t know a lot about rice bran oil, but from what I know, I’m not a fan of it. Coconut Oil, Argan Oil, and Olive Oil serves all my needs and I don’t stray into any of the others very often.

I think the question would come down to if the oil has been used traditionally through historic times. I don’t think that it has, but I don’t know yet.

The oil extracted from rice bran goes rancid quickly. Unlike some other oils, it is not cold-pressed. To refine it, a solvent is used to extract the oil from the germ which is later evaporated off (and tested post-production for residual solvents to double check for traces). That’s followed by neutralisation, bleaching, winterisation and de-odourisation steps, as with most other oils. the rice bran oil is subjected to high temperatures during the extraction phase prior to the filtration. This creates refined and stabilized oil, bringing about a long shelf life and high smoke point. However, what you lose is the “naturalness” of the oil.

Rice bran oil’s ingredient list appears straightforward with no additives but it’s not as ‘natural’ as you would think. The term ‘extra-cold filtered’ is a little confusing. and not to be confused with ‘extra-cold pressed’, a well-known method of producing extra-virgin olive oil.

Leave Your Response

* Name, Email, Comment are Required

“Body”, (Part 40)
a.k.a. “CRAZY” !!!
(….the “Crazy Quads” Slideshow)

Chocolate Waffles

Girl Talk:
Beauty Secrets from Africa
(Part 2)

Grilled Japanese Farm Style Teriyaki Bowl

Food for Thought:
Why Steph Curry Deleted
all his Social Media

“Crazy-Sexy-Cool”
Vegan Smoothies

“Short Story Long…”
(….The Travel Adventures
of Lee Litumbe)

Persimmon Salad with Fennel and Pomegranate

My Top 10
“Fountain of Youth”
Superfoods (Part 2)

Blackened Salmon Caprese Skewers

Ballerina Misty Copeland’s
Five Ways She Eats, Trains and Lives Healthy

Portuguese Chicken Skewers with Cilantro Yogurt Dip

Men’s Natural Body Care
(…becoming an all-natural, GQ “Smooth Operator”)

My Top 30 Superfood
“Power Rankings”
(….numbers 1 thru 10)

The Prostate Cancer Fighting “Fantastic Four” : Broccoli, Turmeric, Green Tea, Pomegranate

Huli Huli Chicken

Toxin Levels in women drop sharply  just 3 after switching to natural makeupdays  (…a recent study says)

Cucumber Roll Appetizers
…with Creamy Avocado

The “Gangster Gardener”
He plants food gardens on vacant lots all over South Central L.A.

The “Green Goddess” Sandwich

Ray Allen’s advice to Dwyane Wade on addressing Wade’s injury plagued career: NUTRITION!!!

Salmon Skewers
with Chili Lime Butter

“The Wanderlust Food Diaries”
“The Edge of a Dream”
The Ubud Hanging Gardens, Bali
Menu: Balinese Cuisine

Sriracha Honey and Sesame Beef Skewers

Escapade!!!
Cyber Traveling with “Travelista Teri”

Summer Glow
“Buddha Bowl”

Dinner and a Movie:
“Mississippi Masala”
Menu: “Mixed Masala” Dinners

Avocado Toast with Goat Cheese and Tomato

Fifty, Fit and Fabulous!!!
Stephanie Person, Age 50 !!!
Nutrition Coach

“Smashed” Avocado Toast
…with Egg

Putting Monsanto in Your Vagina?
…Many Tampons Contaminated with Toxic Glyphosate Herbicide

Cool Fitness Gear!!!
(Part 4)

Healthy Oat Banana Waffles

DIY Skin and BodyCare
Part 6
(a.k.a., The “Orange Article”)

See all articles in “The Healthy Chef’s Cookbook”
(The Art of Food)

See all articles in “Eat Smart”
(The Science of Food)

The GAIA Health Blog
Ranked in Top 100 Health Blogs!!!

(BELOW) Links to my favorite sites who are ”Raging Against the Machine”
(and also some fun cooking blogs)

One Bold Soul: Artist and Writer

(same name, different blog, no need to fight about it)

Real Food Freaks

Kim’s “Nutritionally Well”

THE PAST ON A PLATE
Special ‘shout out’ to this food blogger. Totally different style than me, but my favorite food blog in creativity. She inspired me to start my ‘Dinner and a Movie’ and “Wanderlust Food Diaries’ articles.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Search